NACO

National Association of Charterboat Operators

FAQ

What type of equipment must be carried on an un-inspected charter vessel?

What are the proper procedures for reporting a serious marine incident and what forms should I use?

How many passengers may be carried on an un-inspected vessel?

When are you required to participate in a random drug program?

Does your charter boat require annual inspections?

What is the Coast Guard doing to enforce drug-testing rules?


What type of equipment must be carried on an un-inspected charter vessel?

UN-INSPECTED VESSELS
1. Personal Flotation Devices (PFD) and Other Lifesaving Equipment [46 CFR
25.25].

a. An approved and readily available PFD is required to be on board the
vessel for each individual on board. An exposure suit is considered to be an acceptable substitute for a PFD. All lifesaving equipment designed to be worn is required to be readily available and in serviceable condition.
b. Each vessel 26 feet or longer must have at least one approved ring life buoy which is immediately available. The diameter size of the ring depends on the vessel length. All lifesaving equipment designed to be
thrown into the water is required to be immediately available and in
serviceable condition.
c. An approved commercial hybrid PFD is acceptable if worn when the vessel is underway and the intended wearer is not within an enclosed space; labeled for use on un-inspected commercial vessels; and used as marked and in accordance with the owner's manual.
d. An approved light is required for all PFDs and exposure suits. Also, all
PFDs must have the proper amount of approved retro-reflective material installed.

Fire Extinguishing Equipment [46 CFR 25.30].

a. Hand-portable fire extinguishers and semi-portable fire extinguishing
systems must be of the "B" type (i.e.; suitable for extinguishing fires
involving flammable liquids, greases, etc.).
b. Hand-portable fire extinguishers and semi-portable fire extinguishing
systems must have a plate listing the name of the item, rated capacity
(gallons, quarts or pounds), name and address of person/firm for whom
approved, and manufacturer's identifying mark.
c. Portable fire extinguishers must be inspected and weighed every 6 months.
d. Minimum number of B-II hand portable fire extinguishers required to be on board motor vessels: one if less than 50 tons, two if 50-100 tons, three if 100-500 tons, six if 500-1000 tons, and eight if over 1000 tons.
e. Fixed fire extinguishing systems must be an approved carbon dioxide type and must meet the U.S. Coast Guard requirements. (See reference C.5., Part 25.30-15.)

Backfire Flame Control [46 CFR 25.35].

Every gasoline engine installed after April 25, 1940, except outboard
motors, must be equipped with an acceptable means of backfire flame control.

Ventilation of Tanks and Engine Spaces [46 CFR 25.40].

Fuel tanks and engine spaces, using fuel with a flashpoint of 110 degrees Fahrenheit or less, must be provided with adequate ventilation to remove explosive or flammable gases from the fuel tank compartment or bilges.

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2. What are the proper procedures for reporting a serious marine incident and what forms should I use?

A serious marine incident is defined as:
" One or more deaths
" An injury to any person (including passengers) which requires medical attention beyond first aid and which renders the person unable to perform routine vessel duties (i.e. first aid given by an approved medical facility, may be as simple as having a hook surgically removed)
" Damage to property over $100,000
" Actual or constructive total loss of any inspected vessel
" Actual or constructive total loss of any un-inspected, self propelled vessel of 100 gross tons or more
" Discharge of 10,000 gallons or more of oil into U.S. waters
" A reportable discharge of a hazardous substance into U.S. waters or release of reportable quantities into the U.S. environment
Form CG-2692B must be submitted to the appropriate Officer In Charge, Marine Inspections, following a serious marine incident. The U.S. Coast Guard is now assessing civil penalties against vessel operators who fail to submit the form CG-2692. These, and many other USCG forms may be obtained on the USCG web site.

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3. How many passengers may be carried on an un-inspected vessel?

Un-inspected vessels are limited to no more than six passengers. Remember even an infant is considered a passenger.

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4. When are you required to participate in a random drug program?

Anyone who works in a position of safety onboard a vessel carrying passengers for hire is required to be in an approved random drug-testing program. Captains and crew-members of charter boats are required to participate.

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5. Does your charter boat require annual inspections?

All charter vessels should be inspected by the owner and/or captain at least every year, (some safety items need to be inspected every 6 months) whether USCG inspected or not. USCG certified vessels require a topside safety inspection every 12 months and dry dock inspections between 1 and 3 years depending on the vessel and location.

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6. What is the Coast Guard doing to enforce drug-testing rules?

The USCG checks for the proper documentation and proof of compliance during routine safety inspections on un-inspected vessels and during all required safety and hull inspections on USCG certified vessels. They also check for compliance during license renewals.

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